Chinram


Chinram
   The "land of the Chins," a term used by members of that ethnic nationality to refer to their homeland, located in the mountainous border area between western Burma, northeastern India, and eastern Bangladesh. It includes Chin State ("East Chinram"), Mizoram State in India ("West Chinram"), and upland areas east of the port city of Chittagong in Bangladesh. Some writers (e.g., Lian Sakhong in In Search of Chin Identity) also use Chinram to refer to the ancient homeland of the Chins in the valley of the Chindwin (Chindwinn) River, Chindwin meaning, in the Burmese (Myanmar) language, "hole [cave] of the Chins."

Historical Dictionary of Burma (Myanmar). . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Anglo-Chin War —    (1917 1919)    A major event in the history of Burma s Chins, sparked by the refusal of many young Chin men, especially those belonging to tribes living around Haka (Hakha), to obey British orders to make themselves available for combat and… …   Historical Dictionary of Burma (Myanmar)

  • Chins —    One of Burma s major ethnic minorities, most of whom live in Chin State on the country s mountainous western border with India and Bangladesh, though smaller numbers are found in Arakan State and Magwe (Magway) Division. Census data are… …   Historical Dictionary of Burma (Myanmar)

  • Ram-Uk —     Lord (uk) of the soil/land (ram), referring to the chiefs of the Chins, whose authority encompassed as many as several hundred villages, in which case he was the leader of a tribe. He had the authority to distribute land to cultivators and… …   Historical Dictionary of Burma (Myanmar)